Greencliff.

The start of an acrylic painting of Greencliff near Abbottsham in North Devon. It is here where I go to collect the pigment I use to produce Bideford Black. The base colours are down and the white gesso primer covered. Now to start the painting. Al

Above are pictures of progress so far, I’ve also started another smaller painting of a sunset at Broadsands on Northam Burrows in North Devon.

Roborough Hill.

Another picture inspired from Roborough near Pilton, Barnstaple. I’m using some broken sticks from the hill to create some surface texture. This is painted using Bideford Black hand prepared paint on thick cartridge paper. The view is of looking toward the top of road leading down to Raleigh and Barnstaple. In the distance there is a slight glimpse of the River Taw leading to Fremington Quay, Instow and Crow Point. Al

Man of the world.

A mixed media composition of the late Peter Green who died on the 25th July 2020 aged 73. 540 x 400mm, Bideford Black, Uni-ball fine line pens & Indian Ink. I’ve found this frame on a recent trip to Clifton in Bristol where I discovered it in an antique shop.
Peter Green was one of the greatest Blues guitarists Britain ever produced. His shape-shifting riffs and long, improvisational excursions made Fleetwood Mac one of the most exciting live bands of the 1960s Blues explosion.
He first picked up a hand-me-down guitar at the age of 10 and, like many of his peers, began to devour the import vinyl that trickled into the UK from the US. He studied the greats Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy and BB King – combining their tensely coiled playing style with the shimmering vibrato of The Shadows’ Hank Marvin.
But he actually started his professional career as a bassist, until an encounter with Eric Clapton persuaded him to ditch the instrument.
“I decided to go back on lead guitar after seeing him with the Bluesbreakers. He had a Les Paul, his fingers were marvellous. The guy knew how to do a bit of evil, I guess.”
He later had the seemingly impossible task of taking over from Clapton in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. Fans were unconvinced at first, but after a handful of incendiary performances, he won them over, earning the nickname “The Green God”. Interestingly enough I thought the Green Manalishi was him but Mr Green says it was actually about a wad of cash he dreamt about.


The start of new paintings.

The start of two paintings.
One entitled Westward Ho Pebbles with this I’m going to experiment with montage using cut out and shaded paper pebbles. This is to be painted with Bideford Black on a slightly hardier water colour paper 420 x 560mm. I’ve tried using fairly robust paper in the past but when using a surgical blade to apply scratching, textures and back highlights it proved too hard to utilise properly. This new paper I’m experimenting with will hopefully combine the right balance of hardiness and work-ability.
The second painting, Cannis Aground, will be an acrylic on gesso primed board 900 x 490mm. Well we’ll see how the progress or perhaps not!

Roborough Hill.

A painting in Bideford Black of Roborough Hill in North Devon. During this lockdown time I’ve been trying to find a quiet cycle route for my daily exercise. I’ve found this place at the top of a very steep Roborough Hill. From here the view is amazing with a panorama out over Barnstaple. I’m also quite pleased that I can cycle this hill in my main cog at the grand old age of 62 lol. This is painted on Bockingford paper and the image size in 640 x 410 mm.

https://www.albrownartist.com/post/roborough-hill

Roborough Hill.

Another Bideford Black painting this time of Roborough Hill ten minutes from where I live. I cycle all the way up to the top where you get some sensational panoramic views out over Barnstaple and the River Taw! Early stages at the moment. Al